Posts Tagged With: picturesque

SEMIAHMOO CANNERY ON TONGUE POINT

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On Saturday, we visited the Semiahmoo Cannery on Tongue Point. To do justice to this picture of the old building, click on it twice to enlarge it. It was once the largest salmon cannery in the world.

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The old building has a lot of character.

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Character that will be its demise someday, as it stands slowly rotting away. I expect the money to restore a building like this is scarce or non-existent.

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In that cove a ferry dock takes people across the channel to White Rock British Columbia or to Blaine which is just around the point. I want to kayak while I’m here, but Jim isn’t interested. One rental outfit works off the point. I talked to a family that kayaked to a spot on the U.S. side where they were entranced by a colony of seals with new little pups.

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Another tourist attraction on the point is the Plover Ferry.

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The wide paved bike/pedestrian trail that leads to the point, we learn, is part of the historic Pacific Coast Millennium Trail. What an appealing area to visit.

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Another tourist attraction is the old pirate ships. Two of them entertain by having a battle at sea. We didn’t ride it, but we heard the gunfire as the two ships engaged.

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Plenty of other boat rides are available to anyone wanting a ride on the Salish Sea.

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We drove to the modern Semiahmoo Marina, very pretty, with  restaurants and related businesses about.

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I liked the name of this guy’s boat.

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But, the barnacle clad, old rotting piers at the cannery were much more interesting.DSC07629 (Copy)

This mossy growth is everywhere on the old pilings. I swear, in the wake of even the smallest boats, the pier rocks back and forth as though they aren’t attached at the bottom. A bit disconcerting. But the gulls love it.

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ANTALYA, CITY BY THE SEA

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We unloaded from our bus in Antalya and had to walk to our hotel because the Old Town streets are not big enough for a bus. The Main St. can accommodate  a taxi or van, which is how they got our luggage in.

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The streets in Old Town are cobblestone and vendors take up part of the thoroughfare. A taxi can slip by.DSC05925 (Copy)

Up the narrow side streets, it is a different story. Usla is wise to know we appreciate the quaintness of Old Town.

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Our hotel is the Dogon.

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Our room is a corner room and out one window we can see the beautiful courtyard where we will have our breakfasts and hotel dinners.

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Out the other window is a dilapidated building for sale. We saw squatters with a child living there, or perhaps staying there temporarily.

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Also making a home in the building, a pair of doves.

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In Old Town, gypsy vendors sold merchandise from colorful carts.

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Notice the huge God’s eye. I so regret not getting pictures of shops with huge collections of God’s eyes, of every conceivable decoration and size.

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This vendor has a stand with his scarves and trinkets.

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I didn’t mark the name of this main thoroughfare, but it is lined with old roman sculptures in modern poses. This one is holding his garment up to an ATM machine to catch the money when it falls out.

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The street sweeper.DSC05954 (Copy)

This fellow is using his cell phone. Usla calls them “the government’s sense of humor.”

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A sign with the price of drinks in a bar. At one of our pit stops, I bought a whole bottle of Raki for two Turkish lira.

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You see very little restrictive clothing in a modern city like Antalya. Usla identified this gown and turban wearing gent as a Syrian refuge. It is against the law to wear the Burka in Turkey. The government outlawed this form of restrictive religious dress in 1934 as Turkey became aware of its changing roll on the world stage. In fact, they gave women the right to vote in 1920.

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This is a statue of a water tender who would fill his container with water and sell it on the street, providing a service so people didn’t have to go to the town well for a drink. The water tender is hooked up to a faucett, now.

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We passed this street that reminded several of us of Fremont Street in Las Vegas.

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Usla bought a bagel from a vendor for us to taste, but we had already had them at mini-marts and from street vendors. Unlike anything we know as a bagel, it is tender, delicious, covered in sesame seeds and addictive. Hmmm! Loved them.

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We circled around and ended our walk and chat at the harbor. I swam in the pool in the afternoon while Owen and Usla, along with others took clothing to a laundry. The water was cold, but poolside was slippery marble and I decided it was a dangerous place to be wet. (Gina fell.)

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We had happy hour both nights in a small courtyard near the rooms of Joyce, Judy, Gina, and Maria.

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Since this was a dinner on your own, we found a nice nearby restaurant next to the water. We sat in an open air space looking down on a sandy beach. Usla said they charge 15 tl to use the beach. And, miracle of miracles, Owen ordered  calamari and a second entree of a fish casserole. Both were delicious.

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The atmosphere at this hotel was so pleasant. We early birds are early to breakfast.

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And packed for leaving the next day. I spotted this sign.

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And this one just around the corner from the hotel that I somehow missed after passing it several times.

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We had free time and crossed the main ave into town on what Usla described as “…where the locals shop, better prices.”  Joyce held up this button covered purse for me. (I have a button collection.)

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Such pleasant weather; flowers everywhere.

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gyros is what we eat in the U.S. when we eat Greek. Well, that is, one of the things, depending on where you live.

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I was delighted to run into this yarn covered tree, for two reasons. Jim’s mother was the type of person who knitted and crocheted steadily. Her niece told me if anything was left uncovered, she’d soon crochet or knit it a cove. And, I have pictures of a yarn covered elephant, a bus, a taxi and a picture of this tree. I had no idea the tree was growing on the streets of Antalya, Turkey. And, now I know what a God’s eye is.DSC05981 (Copy)

Tourists line up to ride these horse pulled, decorated buckboard.

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I’m sure there is more to see in this town of interest to tourists. But our time was enjoyable and tomorrow, we will leave the hotel, bags packed, and bus to one of the best museums in Turkey, according to Usla. The museum is about 2 miles from our hotel.

 

 

 

 

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