Posts Tagged With: OK Corral

Tombstone, Arizona (GA37)

Mary is no longer available for RV traveling, but we remain good friends.
Because we have 4,000+ postings, I’ve invited her to continue posting entries on this blog.
I’m currently in my 22nd year of full-time RVing and my lifestyle is changing, For more info click Here

The motorhome is parked at Thousand Trails Soledad Canyon RV Resort at Acton, California. I’m expecting to depart here March 27th.

 

 

Since my RVing life is changing (see above), I’m starting to re-visit previously visited places. So rather than constantly re-blogging past entries, I’ve decided to do something different.

 

 

In 2012-2013, Mary and I did a 682 day, 12,679 miles in the motorhome and 8,000 miles in the Bronco, circumnavigation of the United States, which I called The Great Adventure. I called it so because other than my oldest granddaughter’s high school graduation in June in Connecticut, I didn’t know where we would be going or when we would be there!

 

 

So, unless I do something really different and unusual warranting a new blog entry, I’ll be posting entries from that trip.

 

 

 

This entry was posted March 2, 2012…

 

 

 

The town to tough to die! That’s what they call Tombstone, Arizona. You probably know it as where the famous Gunfight at the O.K. Corral occurred.

 

 

When you are in southeastern Arizona…you cannot be here…and not go to Tombstone. So yesterday Mary and I made the 50 mile round-trip. I believe I’ve been here at least two, perhaps three times, before. Mary told me she has been here once…about 50 years ago.

 

 

if you are not familiar with Tombstone, the below Wikipedia link will inform you…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tombstone,_Arizona

 

 

The way the crow flies…presumably in a straight line…Tombstone lies about 65 miles distant.

 

 

Here’s a Google Earth image…

 

 

 

As always you may left click upon an image to see an enlarged view and then click once again to see an even larger view…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary and I spent an enjoyable five hours wandering around Tombstone. While there we visited Boot Hill, Allen Street (the main drag) and the old courthouse…which has a great museum and is also an Arizona State Historic Park.

 

 

Here are some photos that I took while there…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To see the other 77 photos that I took, click this link…
https://picasaweb.google.com/110455945462646142273/TombstoneArizona

 

 

Tombstone is perhaps the most authentic (though somewhat touristy) Western town left in the West. If you want to experience a taste of the Old West, you need to visit Tombstone.

 

 

 

 

TWO FOR THE PRICE OF ONE! MARY WROTE A MANY GREAT BLOGS…SO WHENEVER SHE PUBLISHED A BLOG POSTING THE SAME DAY THAT I DID…YOU WILL BE ABLE TO READ HER BLOG BY CLICKING THE BELOW LINK! DO IT NOW…!!!

https://otrwjam.wordpress.com/2012/03/02/tombstone-epitomized-the-wild-west/

 

 

 

I HOPE YOU ENJOYED THE PHOTOS.

 Yesterday was mostly sunny and 83 degrees. Forecast for today is mostly sunny and 77 degrees.

Enjoying nice weather is another joy in the life of a full-time RVer!

The red dot on the below map shows my approximate location in the State of California. You may double left-click the map to make it larger…

Enjoying 65-75 degree temperatures with low humidity most of the year is a primary joy in the RVing lifestyle!

“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving”…Albert Einstein

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My current travel rig is a 2006 Fleetwood 26′ Class A Motorhome and a towed 1986 Ford Bronco II, Eddie Bauer Model. This photo was taken in the desert at Slab City near Niland, California…

DSC040481b

On October 27, 2012, I created a two-minute video titled America The Beautiful. The music America The Beautiful is by Christopher W. French. The photos, which I randomly selected, are from the states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Montana, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Tennessee, Washington and West Virginia (not shown in that order)…are mine. Yup, That’s me standing in front of the Post Office in Luckenbach, Texas…Y’all!

Click this link to start the video. Make sure you have your speakers turned on and go to full screen asap.
http://youtu.be/FfZUzEB4rM8

If you would like to see my YouTube videos, click this link… http://www.youtube.com/user/JimJ1579/videos

There are more than 700 photo albums in my Picasa Web Albums File. To gain access, you simply have to click this link… https://get.google.com/albumarchive/110455945462646142273?source=pwa

If you have not checked out my Ramblin Man’s Photos Blog, you can do so by clicking this link…http://ramblinmanphotos.wordpress.com/

For more information about my books, click this link:
http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/panamaorbust

All original works copyrighted – Jim Jaillet -2017

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TOMBSTONE EPITOMIZED THE WILD WEST

The west was full of characters and many of them called Tombstone, Arizona home.  Town was full of grifters, drifters, drunks, gamblers, cowboys, ranchers, ladies of the night, gunfighters, miners, entrepreneurs, card sharks, Mexicans, Indians, Chinks,  money, horses, cattle, feuds, soldiers and Democrats.  A natural hotbed for hostilities and life was cheap. Men killed each other at the slightest perception of being wronged.

There are still gunfighters wandering around town, of a commercial type. There are enactments of the battle at the OK corral every day. Another gunfight at Helldorado’s 5th St. encampment, perhaps others.  Having visited here sometime in the 1960’s, the differences were noticeable. The whole town is now like a movie set. Instead of being surprised by a gunfight at the end of a dusty street, everything is fenced and regulated, you buy tickets to see the gunfights.

The gunfighters look like they belong on this street as part of the regular population.

The bars were full by afternoon and still might be a little wild.

Our bartender at the American Legion  in town, told us the population is aging, not increasing, and town couldn’t survive without tourists. And, it is a fascinating place to visit despite the commercialism. Do go. There is much to see and do and great history here to enjoy,

Many people in this cemetery died violently. Seymour Dye was only 35 years old, taking in a load of hay with his friend Harry Curry, when they were ambushed by Indians, shot, then tied and dragged 150 feet by the Indian’s horse.

Yes, five men legally hanged. The gang leader,  who didn’t participate in the robbery but was suspected of planning it,  was dragged out of  jail by an incensed mob of citizens from Bizbee, blindfolded and strung up on a telephone pole.

Violent, frontier justice. Four Bizbee citizens were killed during the robbery. This picture is from the museum. The coroner’s report said:  “I find  the victim died of emphysima (sic) caused by strangulation, self-inflicted or otherwise.”

Mrs. Stump died in childbirth when given an overdose of chloroform by her doctor.  This cemetery has more violent and awful deaths among its 250 known dead than any cemetery but a military cemetery. At my last visit, the graves had rickety wooden markers in the bare ground. It has been improved immensely with stone mounds, and verifications of most of those buried here. Popular and fascinating, especially when you visit the museum at the old County Courthouse and get the facts behind some of these quarrels.

This is Frank Leslie who killed at least three of those in the cemetery. He got his violent death in the end.

The gallows now sits behind the courthouse in the exercise yard.  It was built for the  five men from Heith’s gang and a set bleachers was built on the street to watch the hangings as entertainment. Nellie Cashman,  known as  the Angel of the Camp for her many good works, gave solace to the condemned men in jail. One confided he knew he would die, but he objected to the indignity of being a spectacle.  She quietly manged to get help and turned the bleachers into a pile of kindling the night before the hanging.

William Greene, a farmer who used water from a ditch quarreled with his neighbor Burton over the water. His little girls went swimming in the shallow waters during the hot summers.  Burton let water out of the dam to increase the flow and the water made a deep hole in the ditch. When the girls went swimming, two of them drowned. Greene killed Burton, but was exonerated for his vengeance by the courts.

Deaths on the streets are now visible on the spot where they happened by plaques around town.

There are a number of horse-drawn wagons and stages of different types around town offering one of a kind rides.

We were particularly pleased to see an authentic Butterfield Stage, one of the most uncomfortable rides in the world. A humorous description from a more “comfortable” stage ride (in the museum), the rider claims he wouldn’t have lived through it if the stage hadn’t come to places where the passengers had to get out and walk. It was their only salvation, getting off the hard seats and moving about.

It isn’t often that you have a chance to get  close and friendly with  great percherons.

And, never before have I encountered  a waiter packin’  a gun. We had good food at the Helldorado Chuck Wagon.

We didn’t get to see it all. We could have spent more time, so be prepared to stay a whole day when you visit or return for a second look. Fun town.

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