Posts Tagged With: eating

I Reach My Weight Loss Goal…55.5 Pounds Gone!

 Mary is no longer available for RV traveling, but we remain good friends.
Because we have 4,000+ postings, I’ve invited her to continue posting entries on this blog.
I’m currently in my 22nd year of full-time RVing and my lifestyle is changing, For more info click Here

The motorhome is parked at Thousand Trails Thunderbird RV Resort in Monroe, Washington. I’m currently scheduled to depart here October 4th.

 

 

Yesterday I finally achieved my weight loss goal of 55.5 pounds!  🙂

 

The process began Labor Day weekend of 2016 when I weighed in at a resounding 212.5 pounds. Never in my life had I weighed that much!

 

It all came about by not paying attention. Week after week and year after year. I spend a fair amount of my time socializing at VFW, American Legion, Eagles and Moose clubs. Beer and bar foods along with good conversations and BOOM, it had happened!

 

Here are two photos I found of my “chunkiness”…

 

As always you may left click upon an image to see an enlarged view and then click once again to see an even larger view…

 

 

 

 

 

I’m on the far right in this photo taken in July, 2013…

 

 

 

 

Mary took this photo of me in April, 2016…

 

 

Enough is enough, I said. I put myself on a modified Atkins Diet…restricting myself to a maximum of 25 grams of carbohydrates a day. They say the last ten pounds comes off the hardest, so I dropped to zero carbs per day during that time.

 

 

 

 

I looked at my discharge paper from the U.S. Navy in April of 1962. It stated I was 157 pounds at that time and I chose that weight as my ultimate goal. The below photo as taken in Amsterdam, Holland in 1960 when I was 19 years old and probably 157 pounds…

 

 

 

 

Here’s a photo my friend Al took about three weeks ago when I was at 162.5 pounds, still wearing the same shorts and t-shirt I wore at 212.5 pounds…

 

 

 

 

Here’s a selfie I took a week ago at 159 pounds…

 

 

 

Here’s the thing about weight…it can only be doing one of three things…

1- going up
2- staying the same
3- going down
And if you do not pay attention, it will usually slowly start going back up.
So, the question is now…how do I keep from putting the weight back on????
The answer is simple. During my weight loss I kept a chart on my microwave oven door and once a week I marked the chart so I had a visual presentation of my weight loss.

The below photo shows the last several weeks of my weight loss…

The vertical line on the left marked my one year on the diet. The bottom line is now representing my current weight of 157 pounds. The top horizontal line is 162 pounds. So, in the future, I will continue keeping my weight chart and allow myself a five-pound “bounce around” area between 157 and 162 pounds. By constantly monitoring my weight every week, I’ll keep it under control. Simple!

I found a carbohydrate calculator online. It told me that for my age, weight, exercise and activity, that if I stay under 176 carbs per day, I’ll maintain my weight. If I stay under 136 carbs per day, I’ll continue to lose body fat.

So, I’ll start slowly upping my carb intake. For now, I’m going to limit my carb intake to about 50 per day and proceed a day at a time.

So, the bottom line is…

I lost 55.5 pounds in 55.5 weeks to arrive at 157 pounds, the same weight I was 55.5 years ago!  🙂

 

 

 

 

I HOPE YOU ENJOYED THE PHOTOS.

 Forecast for today is sunny and 63 degrees.

Enjoying nice weather is another joy in the life of a full-time RVer! The red dot on the below map shows my approximate location in the State of Washington. You may double left-click the map to make it larger…

 

 

united-states-mapMON

 

Enjoying 65-75 degree temperatures with low humidity most of the year is a primary joy in the RVing lifestyle!

“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving”…Albert Einstein
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My current travel rig is a 2006 Fleetwood 26′ Class A Motorhome and a towed 1986 Ford Bronco II, Eddie Bauer Model. This photo was taken in the desert at Slab City near Niland, California…
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On October 27, 2012, I created a two-minute video titled America The Beautiful. The music America The Beautiful is by Christopher W. French. The photos, which I randomly selected, are from the states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Montana, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Tennessee, Washington and West Virginia (not shown in that order)…are mine. Yup, That’s me standing in front of the Post Office in Luckenbach, Texas…Y’all!

Click this link to start the video. Make sure you have your speakers turned on and go to full screen asap. http://youtu.be/FfZUzEB4rM8
If you would like to see my YouTube videos, click this link… http://www.youtube.com/user/JimJ1579/videos
There are more than 700 photo albums in my Picasa Web Albums File. To gain access, you simply have to click this link… https://get.google.com/albumarchive/110455945462646142273?source=pwa
If you have not checked out my Ramblin Man’s Photos Blog, you can do so by clicking this link…http://ramblinmanphotos.wordpress.com/
For more information about my books, click this link: http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/panamaorbust
All original works copyrighted – Jim Jaillet -2017
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TAHOE SOUTH SHORE

dsc08453-copyThe last two years, we’ve rented a place at Incline Village for Christmas, skiing and playing in the snow. This year we decided a summer family reunion would be a fun change. We arrived Friday night. Doug, who is an expert at barbecuing anything to perfection, fixed hamburgers after our long drive. My camera was packed and I didn’t get a picture. Everyone resorted to a game of pool. It was Doug and Ken, against Laurie and Kristanne.

dsc08452-copyKristanne had never played pool before, and Laurie, who grew up with a pool table, is a shark.

dsc08455-copyShe knows how to bounce those balls.

dsc08456-copyEveryone had a turn at the table, and after the games, everyone decided to be silly. A bit of wine and tequila probably helped.

dsc08459-copyNo one really cared who won or lost. Laughter is what counts.

dsc08460-copyThe next morning, most of us went for hike to the National Park.

dsc08463-copyI was ahead and turned to catch this sisterly hug. Don’t have a clue what inspired it.

dsc08464-copyWe had seen signs about a rope walk in the canopy and thought everyone would like that activity.  But, it was closed. Left to right is Cedric, Ken, Virginia, Austin, who seems fixated on a two finger salute. Then Laurie, Theo and Kristanne. Doug and Owen stayed back at the cabin.

dsc08467-copyWe stopped for a couple pictures, but the sun was at the high, bright time of day and we got a lot of squints and shut eye.

dsc08472-copyWe snacked and reminisced for lunch.

dsc08498-copyAt four o’clock Saturday afternoon, we skyped with my grandson Stewart in Japan where he teaches English as a second language.

dsc08500-copyWe asked him dozens of questions. Here he is explaining that his deodorant melted and he had to shave his armpits. The Japanese people seem fascinated by his facial hair. Komatsu, is a coastal town of about 100,000 people. It isn’t a tourist destination and they don’t see many foreigners. Students are very disciplined and continually kind of bow and say “hye” as a way to indicate they understand. He is learning to use that expression as well and practiced it for us. Technology is awesome and we loved the ability to spend a half hour with Stew.

dsc08511-copyIt was Ken and Laurie’s night to fix dinner, and they prepared a marvelous shrimp dish, with butter and lemon juice and pepper. The kitchen is small here. Everyone went to bed early

dsc08515-copyVirginia made scratch muffins for breakfast Sunday morning. She picked the wild berries on their property on the Eel River.

dsc08481-copyShe also got “into” olives this year and brought 3 different kinds of olives she made from trees growing around Santa Clara. Theo declared they were inedible and about the worst thing you could eat. I loved them and got to bring some home.

dsc08517-copyAt 9:00 a.m. Virginia treated  Kris and I to kayaking.  Ken took pictures of us before he and Laurie went for a ride to see the scenery around Silver Lake.

dsc08522-copyI’ve enjoyed kayaking before, but Virginia wisely chose a double for us since my shoulder is not completely healed. I had to rest from paddling periodically and she had to pull for both of us.

dsc08525-copyKristanne, always adventurous, had never kayaked. She took to it like a duck to water and said, “Hey, I get to mark it off my bucket list.” We rested on a distant beach, then sunned and dried out on a rock when we returned.

dsc08503-copyKristanne and Laurie enjoyed a game of Rumikub in the afternoon.

dsc08489-copyThe boys played pool or read a book.

dsc08529-copyEveryone played 13, the national game of Vietnam. It is limited to four so each of us dipped in and out of the game. It is one of those games where kids have just as much chance of winning as an adult and Theo proved it. Not visible, on the right is Doug, playing DJ and selecting our favorite tunes on the computer.

dsc08487-copyCedric took to the kitchen to bake pies for dinner.

dsc08504-copyThis cabin was as close to wreckage as you can find in a domicile, and the oven temperature was difficult to gauge.  He struggled to get them cooked well. But, as usual, they turned out delish.

dsc08534-copySo, most of Sunday was spent playing games, eating, gabbing…

dsc08480-copy…snoozing.

dsc08539-copyVirginia showed off her skill with Theo’s juggling balls.

dsc08542-copyDuring the evening, Hearts was the game of choice.

dsc08508-copyThere was some high finance going on downstairs with a monopoly game with Austin, Theo, Doug and Owen.

dsc08543-copyKen opted to wade through the New York Times and a San Francisco Chronicle.

dsc08547-copySome of us walked to the beach and watched the fireworks.

dsc08548-copyIt was a lovely, busy, relaxing. three-day getaway with stuff to do for everyone’s taste. Can’t wait until next year.

 

 

 

 

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HEALTHY, SUSTAINABLE AND TASTY-FOOD.

There was a time when no one read labels or worried about what was in their food. Food went directly from the garden, or farm, to our tables-locally.  Ogden Nash wrote the Clean Platter from which I’ve stolen some entertaining lines:

“Some singers sing of ladies’ eyes, and some of ladies ‘ lips. Refined ones praise the ladylike ways, and coarse ones hymn their hips. The Oxford Book of English Verse, is lush with lyrics tender; A poet, I guess, is more or less, preoccupied with gender.

Yet I, though custom call me crude, prefer to sing in praise of food. Food, yes food. I brood on food.”

But a clean platter today is difficult. Big industrial farms provide millions of Americans with affordable food and they still make a profit. Commendable as long as it is healthy food, and for the most part it is. But we too must brood on food.

Loop holes in regulations and competitiveness, the rock of capitalism, has changed the state of our plate.  Eating  healthfully shouldn’t be a battle.  Inaccurate labeling; hiding the sugar content by listing it under 16 different names;  labels that don’t tell you where your food comes from. Your label may read processed in the United States, but that doesn’t mean it was grown or raised here. Monsanto spends billions to make GMO products free from labeling. Genetically modified foods have been with us for a century, but not with pesticides built into the seeds. Round-up laden seeds, have, as a by-product,  produced super weeds, resistant to Round-up and other herbicides.

Cooperation between sustainable, small-scale, community based, organic and humane,  food for all has been quietly taking over, spurred by activists in the Good Food Uprising, the fastest growing segment of our food economy. That’s the good news.

But, it depends on what state you live in.  Consider the Thanksgiving turkey and the Christmas ham. Industrial geneticists designed a turkey with such massive breasts, they couldn’t stand up on their own feet or even reproduce. Held in a sprawling concrete and steel animal factories. But here, I can drive across the river to Tuolumne County and buy my turkey from a ranch where turkeys run free and gobble at you from behind their fenced enclosure. And, they sell them all plastic wrapped like any other turkey in our local grocery stores. Tough on young families because they cost more.

Hogs are smart and social. They feel stress and pain. But the agri-giants callously raised sows in confined cages where they could not even turn around. Forced to be perpetual birthing machines, immobilized where they forlornly wave their heads back and forth and chew on their cages. Moved to a birthing crate, then stripped of their babies and re-impregnated for another round of enforced gestation.  Investigative reporters, worker whistle blowers, the Humane Society  and outraged consumers of every stripe have turned around many of these atrocities. Millions of hogs have been set free. (Unfortunately, not in the Carolinas.) That’s why I want a label that tells me where my meat comes from.

What’s nice is that restaurants like Chipolte Grill, Burger King, Whole Foods, Costco, Oscar Mayer and even Wal-Mart has responded by refusing to use or sell factory raised meat.

But, fish is another matter. Wal-Mart clearly labels their shrimp from Vietnam, Indonesia, India, and other Asian countries so you know it comes from polluted waters. It is cheap. If you like shrimp, the U.S. is a huge producer of wild, healthy shrimp. You might rethink cheap because some countries keep peelers in slave-like conditions to peel those shrimp for export. It has become a scandal in Vietnam. And imported shrimp has a higher bacteria rate than home-grown.    Some stores repackage their shrimp and label it “Processed in the U.S.”  Don’t buy into that deception.

Oil interests have found a new use for their witches brew of 750 toxic chemicals in fracking water, selling it to agribusiness to water their crops instead of power blasting it into the ground water. Nice. Let’s have a bit of poison on our salad. California Assemblyman, Frank Gato produced legislation requiring warning labels on all state vegetables irrigated with fracking water.  Yay!  The downside is you have to ask your produce person, or store manager because the label is so small you can’t read it. (Well, I can’t read it.)

I don’t want to fight for bees suffering from Colony Collapse from Neurotoxins such as sulfoxaflor, to keep them safe to pollinate food crops we depend on;  or fight for fair labeling. Why must we put up with plastic packaging that can make us sick. (Do not warm foods in the microwave in plastic and steer clear of BPA leaching plastics numbered 3 or 7.)  We can’t trust our own FDA because they’ve sold out to special interests approving untested chemicals that affect our food and water.

And countries are supposed to report their emissions as we begin to broadside climate change. I read constant condemning reports of coal-burning plants in China. But, the U.S., through some marvelous congressional loophole, does not report emissions from the meat industry.  Congress attached a provision to the EPA’s budget. It prohibited the agency from spending money to collect emission reports on livestock producers—specifically the greenhouse gases emitted from some of the 335 million tons of manure produced each year.  Livestock producers, which include meat and dairy farming, account for about 15% of greenhouse gas emissions around the world. That’s more than all the world’s exhaust-belching cars, buses, boats and trains combined.

A team of researchers from Harvard University, Stanford University, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and elsewhere worked together to collect air samples and analyze actual emissions near large livestock operations such as cattle feeding lots in California, Nebraska, and Iowa. They found that greenhouse gas emissions from livestock were twice as bad as what the EPA estimated. The United States is under-reporting its total greenhouse gas emissions to the United Nations by about 4 percent per year as a result of bad livestock data—nearly equivalent to the entire emissions of Spain. Thanks Congress.

During our water crisis, here in the West, the biggest wasters are agri-giants. Scientists at the Pacific Institute and National Geographic calculated how much water is being pumped into today’s industrialized food system:

One little almond: 1 gallon; a head of lettuce: 12 gallons; an egg: 53 gallons; a gallon of milk: 880 gallons; a single walnut; 5 gallons; a cluster of grapes: 24 gallons; a pound of chicken; 468 gallons; a pound of beef: 1,800 gallons.  I don’t want to hear nor believe this. I don’t want to feel guilty for every handful of almonds I eat every morning. How can this be? It is unsustainable to allow profitable factory-farms to waste a public resource as important as water. I have walnut and almond trees in my orchard and I know it doesn’t take that much water to grow them if you aren’t wasting it.

For me, I’m giving up most canned foods and cardboard packaged foods. I’m using up what I have and investing in a plastic vacuum sealer that keeps frozen food fresh, fresh, fresh. The plastic is safe and the food doesn’t develop a taste from keeping your summer applesauce and plum sauce for as long as it lasts. Some years I have a heavy apple crop and some years I don’t.  I can buy blueberries, raspberries and strawberries, frozen, or fresh in season. Fresh frozen organic vegetables are readily available. I’m working to keep my platter healthy, so I don’t have to interpret labels and worry about my food anymore.  I never donate to congress, try these groups, where I got my information,  if you want change:

http://www.fooddemocracynow.org, http://www.waterdefense.org, www. youngfarmers.org, http://www.earthjustice.org, http://www.humanesociety.org,www.revealnews.org, http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org

Mother Jones magazine, Jim Hightower’s Lowdown Newsletter.

 

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GEESE ON THE RIVER

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You’ve heard that song, I’m sure, 99 bottles of beer on the wall?  I couldn’t believe it when I unloaded my camera and I had 99 pictures of geese. I managed to toss 53. Jim always offers to get me down to ten pictures, but, I tell him I intend to paint some day and I need models.

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It was tough to pick photos because we are getting close to our limit on bytes. These geese look like they should be on the Christmas platter.

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This one was just poking its head under the water for a morsel, but often they turn upside down, and I found myself laughing to see three butts in a row sticking out of the water.

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I felt I learned a lot about geese observing them for most of the day while I sat on this gorgeous river bank and read my book with my camera close by.This is a mad goose, steaming through the water, head down, chasing a flock away from a particularly popular log so his bunch could move in and take a bath.

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This is that same stance, this time a mother head down, challenging anyone to interfere with her goslings as she made her way through the crowd.

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Later in the day, they moved onto the grass to feed on bugs and grasses. They feed in a group with an ever protective gander watching over all.

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Actually, these mallards had the log first and got chased away by the geese.

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I took a short walk along the river’s edge where bright flowers grow in the sandy soil.DSC06998 (Copy)

Folks, including me, appreciate the river on a hot Saturday afternoon, quiet and soothing.

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Fishing, kayaking and canoeing are popular. I was grateful no one used a noisy skee-doo. It is quiet and beautiful here at the Elks Club where we will be parked until I fly to Las Vegas on the 5th. It was hot yesterday and the river is cooling.

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I spotted this little turtle making a bee-line to the water. The minute I got close enough to take a picture, he stopped and hid from me. As soon as I walked away, he completed his journey.

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From out of the woods came this mystery animal. Some type of rodent, I think.  At first, I thought it could be a baby beaver.

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I got a good look at its tail. I remember beavers having a flat, rounded kind of fleshy tail. I looked up nutria and they have definite rodent, rat-like tails. This is a mystery animal. If anyone knows what it is, let me know.

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