NO WATER, WATER, WATER.

Final-CA-Cities_1

This graph comes from Mother Jones Magazine. California is in deep trouble as is Southern Oregon. I opened my accumulated mail and my water usage, while I was gone, with only one person living in my house was over the base amount by a small amount. Our base amount was recently reduced by 20%. No sprinkling system was used during that time. Karen hand watered plants that appeared to be dry. We are both water misers and what bothers me about percentage cuts is that water misers are unfairly penalized. The next cut will be 30% we are warned. We know it has to be done and our water usage must be altered.

Final-Crop-Map_1

I stopped for fresh produce yesterday and paid $38 for a small bag of all organic produce and counted my blessings that I can afford to buy locally grown food that doesn’t have to be hauled across the state in a big gas guzzling truck, and sit for a week in a box in cold storage at the grocers.

Final-gallons-per-food_2

It was also interesting to see what fruits and vegetables use the most water. I was surprised that California citrus and avocados and cherries were not on the list. I always consider them major parts of the California economy. It seems useful to me to know what foods are water lovers and which are not. I haven’t planted a garden since my neighbor shares his with me. I have an unused well and I’m looking into activating it but it only gives 9 gallons per minute.  Now I hear, the county has decided to tax people’s wells. I have to wonder whether I will be taxed at the same rate as another neighbor who gets 64 gallons a minute?  I have no ready answers. Karen and I are going to work on a crude water catchment system before our predicted rain on Wednesday. I’ll keep you posted.

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | 4 Comments

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4 thoughts on “NO WATER, WATER, WATER.

  1. Two words: Golf courses!

    Not hard to figure out where the cuts should be made. Not to the home gardeners. The way they figure the percentage cuts is totally assinine. As you point out, you are penalized for having been thrifty with the water all along.

    When we lived in a townhouse association in Sunnyvale, the water was included in the dues (15 years ago), but there was always the buzz about families with children in diapers. There were 360 units, and I saw very few babies/children. It was mostly couples who both worked, so, in truth, water usage was probably pretty mild.

    The overall landscaping was drought tolerant, and no one had any private grassy areas to deal with. The complex was built starting in 1984, and great care was taken to make sure that plantings would not require a great deal of water. We lived next door to the chairman of the landscaping committee, and they were keenly aware of what needed to be done. I don’t think there was a drought then, but they planned for one.

    I’ve seen some Google Earth views of the area now, and the trees are HUGE! We loved it there, but the congestion of people, the increasing pollution, and the threat of another Loma Prieta, finally drove us out in 1998. Having survived the 1989 shaker, we were not eager to risk another.

    Woops! I had intended to write only “two words”. ;->

    Virtual hugs,

    Judie

    • 2gadabout

      I just came from Palm Springs area and they have 106 golf courses. I was told they water them with gray water. I wonder if it is true? I loved your two words, though. LOL I’m convinced I can do without most of my plants. I’ll probably have to. In a former drought, I lost all ornamentals and food plants that were not tight to the house. My walnut trees seem to survive best under drought conditions. I know they have deep roots.

  2. Even if it is true, that same grey water could be used on other areas instead. Can you tell I am not a golfer? ;->

    • 2gadabout

      Great point! Like food crops without mega chemicals. You’ve probably been there, but the golf courses are hidden behind walls, only a couple are in the open. Hiding? I’m not a golfer either.

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