Jim’s long time friend, who chooses to remain anonymous, introduced us to her two best friends, Mary Berg and Pat McKay.  Mary is a psychic and does individual readings. Once she was asked to help the local police department on a case of theirs. She is an upbeat, interesting woman to talk too.

Pat McKay, is the former wife of  Buck Duane Walker,  who murdered Muff and Mack Graham,  a couple living on their sailboat on the Island of Palmyra. Palmyra  is  located off the coast of Hawaii. It was a sensational case when it happened in the 1960’s and the book, The Sea Shall Tell,  was written about the event, and the capture and trial of Buck’s girlfriend,  Stephanie.   Pat was married to Buck for ten years, and knew him for 40 years.  He was a mesmerizing, clever, self-educated man and a psychopath. She visited him in prison, got to know his girlfriend,  Stephanie after the murders,  and even had a strange tie to Muff and Mack Graham, the two murder victims.   Pat’s family introduced  her aunt to date Mack before he met Muff. The Graham’s lived aboard their boat sailing the world over in much the same way RVers live on wheels, moving from one destination to another.

Pat  was grateful it was not she who sailed to Palmyra with Buck Walker. The book  was written by Richard Henderson and the attorney, Vincent Bugliosi who defended Stephanie.  Pat claims it was really Henderson who wrote the book. It was later made into a movie by the same name. Jim became quite fascinated by this case because he discovered  that Buck  Walker, while serving life in prison, wrote his version of the events that happened on the Island, under his father’s name, Wesley Walker.  Jim found his story interesting, well written and credible.

We enjoyed meeting Pat, and hearing about her interesting life.  She has written an as yet unpublished book about her life and how it intersected with the people who met their fate on the Island of Palmyra.   She met Jim’s friend while living in Mexico and they both moved to Deming.

It is interesting to meet someone who has a lot of  “inside”  information about the real life characters of a book you just chanced to read.  I can’t wait to read Pat’s book and will let you know on this blog when it is available. Sometimes you meet people who change your life. It was so for Pat McKay.

TO CAPE COD BY FERRY

June 17, 2010

Arriving on  Marthas Vineyard by ferry a week ago, locked in the dark behind a huge truck, we were unable to open the door, get out, and walk around.  I wasn’t looking forward to the ride back. We got there early and Jim asked if we could take an earlier ferry and his request was granted. Leaving for Cape Cod by ferry proved to be a very different event. As we entered, first in line, its difficult to imagine that this ferry can take five lanes of traffic. Placed up front, no cars blocked our exit from the motor home and we gladly went up on deck to enjoy the ride.

The tall ships anchor on one side of the harbor…

the small boats on the other side.

A boat, just out of the picture, looked like it was going to run into the ferry. By the time I turned on my camera and aimed, he disappeared behind it.

It was cool and beautiful on deck as we watched boaters play, and the Island disappear.

A bell buoy is no big deal to people who live here, but hearing them toll in the wind, and being a New England Newbie, I finally got a good look at one.

We pulled into the landing with a front seat view. The new crew was waiting on deck for the old crew to get off. We found out the ferry we were supposed to take was held up for mechanical problems and we luckily missed that frustrating experience.

It didn’t take long for “reality” to sink in. A short drive from the ferry landing and we met our first stop light. (It turned green just as I snapped the picture.)
And, I have an amendment to make. Though we were refused  alcohol with our meals twice, and told we were in a dry county, we saw ads and signs that indicate that some places on the island allow you to have beer or wine in an eating establishment. And, we saw a discount liquor store where you could  buy spirits. Its a mystery to me. Years ago, in Kansas, we ran into a dry county. You could not buy anything alcoholic. If you brought it in your car from another county, and were caught, you could be ticketed. Dry county means different things in different states.

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