Note…I’m currently hanging out in the motorhome at the Moose Lodge in Silver City, New Mexico waiting on the completion of a transmission rebuild for my 1986 Ford Bronco II

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Much like a light switch on a wall…we flick the switch and presto…there’s electricity! Most folks do not have a concept of the complexities behind that switch that brings the electricity to our homes. And it is indeed a complex system.

Much the same with the automatic transmissions in our vehicles. We simply start the vehicle…put it in drive or reverse and be on our way. Most folks do not have a concept of the complexities of this device that takes the energy produced by an engine and converts it to vehicle motion.

As you saw in the above note I’m awaiting completion of a transmission rebuild for my 1986 Ford Bronco II. Yesterday I spent three hours at the garage where they began the dis-assembly of the transmission. With Nacho’s help I was shown the reasons for my transmission failure as a thrust washer that had broken in to two pieces and went where they were not supposed to be.

Here are some photos…

As always you may left click upon an image to see an enlarged view and then click once again to see an even larger view...

First the transmission before the start of the dis-assembly process…

Nacho, the mechanic, mounted the transmission casing to a work bench to begin the dis-assembly process…

And then two photos of the major components of the transmission…

The work bench is covered with internal parts from the transmission which is only about one-half dis-assembled at this point…

I’m not sure how many individual parts there are in my transmission…but I guessing somewhere well in excess of 100. And unless they all go together in a very precise manner…the transmission will fail to do its job. That’s one of the reasons that a transmission rebuild is so expensive.

However…I hold no hard feeling against my transmission for needing to be rebuilt. Automobiles are nothing more than mechanical. electrical and electronic components in a single vessel. They work hard to deliver us where we desire to go. After 150,000 miles…I have no complaints. With a little time and a few $’s I’ll once again soon be on my way. We only give it a thought when it doesn’t work.

Nacho is hoping to have it ready for me by Friday afternoon.

All original material Copyright – Jim Jaillet 2012
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THUNDERBIRD RESORT

June 11, 2011

Located on a country road, set on the Snohomish River, seven miles from the town of Monroe, is Thunderbird Thousand Trails Resort. Foreboding clouds, spritzer rain, and cold, in contrast to our last stay here in July of 2009 when I couldn’t get enough of the beauty of this river. I must have snapped 30 pictures of melting sunsets. Where went summer?

We managed to get the exact same spot we had in 2009, near the laundry, on the river side of the resort.  We spent the morning doing household chores and didn’t get out to walk  until after dinner walk. The weather cleared, some, but summer still seems far away. Jim always comes to Monroe to catch up with friends, Mike and Vicki Coleman.  Mike is a mechanic and looks after the Bronco. Jim sold his old Bronco from this spot and had the “new” out fitted  as his “toad” that  July.  Jim’s  grammar/high school pal, Al Penta,  lives in Monroe. An avid cyclist, Al  bikes about 20 miles every morning and speeds right by the resort. Too early for us, however, and we get up at five a.m.

Across the road from us is the Family Lodge for the resort.

Someone painted a decent rendition of it on the TV dish at the Adult Lodge.

The grounds are beautifully landscaped, hilly, and cover about ten acres. This poppy is the size of a small cabbage.

Rhododendrons resemble balloons.

I’ll be making good use of the pool and hot tub here, before I leave for California on Monday.  I know the weather will clear and be sweet and sunny when I leave.  It’s Murphy’s law!

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